Noon Programs

The Monday series of talks, sponsored by the Friends of the Library,  is held at noon in the McChesney Room of the Central Library on Clinton Street. You may bring a bag lunch; coffee and tea are available for a nominal fee. The room is equipped with special devices for the hearing-impaired. These programs are also broadcast on the Schenectady Public Access channel.

NOON PROGRAMS

The Monday series of talks, sponsored by the Friends of the Library,  is held at noon in the McChesney Room of the Central Library on Clinton Street. You may bring a bag lunch; coffee and tea are available for a nominal fee. The room is equipped with special devices for the hearing-impaired.

Books Sandwiched In
Patricia Rush, Coordinator

Feb. 27: Gene Rowland, coordinator of noon programs for the Friends of the Library, will review a new book about the Erie Canal, Heaven’s Ditch: God, Gold and Murder on the Erie Canal, by Jack Kelly. The Erie Canal made New York the commercial capital of America, and brought the modern world “crashing into the frontier.”

SCIENCE SERIES
George Wise, Coordinator

March 6: Ricki Lewis – “Update on Genetics”. Ricki is a biologist and science writer.

March 13: Grace Barber –“Discovering the Albany Pine Bush”. Grace is the educator at the Albany Pine Bush Nature Preserve.

March 20: Ahmed Elasser –“Steinmetz: Engineer and Citizen”. Ahmed is an engineer at GE Global Research.

March 27: Norm Shilling – “Coal: Past, Present and Future”. Norm is currently retired after a long career as a technical contributor in the energy and environmental industries.

BOOKS SANDWICHED IN
Gene Rowland, Coordinator

April 3 – Tea with Freud: An Imaginary Conversation About How Psychotherapy Really Works by Steven P. Sandler. Reviewed by the author. From Penelope Y. Andrade, LCSW,Author, Emotional Medicine Rx : “I thoroughly enjoyed reading Steven Sandler’s Tea with Freud. As a writer myself, I so appreciated the light touch, grace, and charm with which Dr. Sandler was able to weave historical psychoanalytic notions, compelling case transcripts, and touching personal revelations into a gripping evolutionary tale. I loved learning so much so effortlessly. I particularly appreciated the ending. I’ve already given away my first copy… now ordering moreto have on hand for sophisticated clients. I’ll be highly recommending this book to friends and colleagues for years to come. “

April 10 – Decision at Strasbourg: Ike’s Strategic Mistake to Halt the Sixth Army Group at the Rhine in 1944, by David P. Colley. Reviewed by Joan Ham. This book relates the remarkable and largely unknown story of Lt. General Jacob Devers’ lost opportunity to launch a bold attack into the heart of Nazi Germany, which may have won the European war in late 1944, six months before VE Day. Joan Ham is active in many community activities and is well known to SCPL audiences. She also brings background knowledge about General Devers.

April 24 – How the Post Office Created America: A History by Winifred Gallagher. Reviewed by Donald Gavin. A masterful history of a long underappreciated institution, this book examines the surprising role of the postal service in our nation’s political, social, economic, and physical development. Don Gavin is a member of the UCALL Curriculum Committee, and has had a lifelong interest in American history. He says about the book, “If you want to read about a government agency promoting public good, read this book.”