Noon Programs

Noon Programs Go Hybrid!

This year the Noon Programs, starting with the Fall Books Sandwiched in, will be offering a hybrid program. We are happy to be able to be in the McChesney Room as much as possible. There may be dates when the McChesney Room is not available, or we have scheduled a speaker who is not local.  If you want to join us virtually, you will find the Zoom link in the Events calendar on the library website, and listed below. We hope to see many of you “live” in the library as much as possible. However, now that we’ve become accustomed to virtual programs, we have a great option when in-person is either not available or inconvenient.

In addition, this year we are trying to provide different and hopefully interesting programs. As an example, the first two programs in September will not be our usual book reviews. We are trying something different, a participatory poetry reading, and a friendly political debate. Your feedback is welcomed and will help us plan in the future. You may reach me at gemu179@hotmail.com.

Geri Mulligan,Noon Programs Chair

              FALL 2021
BOOKS SANDWICHED IN

               Coordinated by Bill Levering (September) and Jack  Rightmyer (October)

September 13. “Friends Read Frost”  Fans of Robert Frost will read one or two of their favorites, commenting on the impact of the poetry on them.  Frost fanatic Gene Rowland will be featured.  Email Bill Levering at blevering@gmail.com and let him know if you’d like to participate. You may participate in person or virtually using our Zoom link.
Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3405061738?pwd=dXI0eHR0dHBoRjRYLzV3UlFtQmh1UT09
Meeting ID: 340 506 1738
Passcode: 682539

September 20.  “How to Disagree”  Lifelong Democrat Bill Levering and staunch Republican Cathy Lewis will disagree in public about Deirdre McCloskey’s book, “Leave Me Alone and I’ll Make You Rich”.  Come watch the happy fireworks and learn how to leave as friends.
Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3405061738?pwd=dXI0eHR0dHBoRjRYLzV3UlFtQmh1UT09
Meeting ID: 340 506 1738
Passcode: 682539

September 27.  “Changing Children’s Books” The last decades have brought change to our culture and this is reflected in the books written for children.  Come listen to the library staff discuss the changes in the last years and how it affects the library.
Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3405061738?pwd=dXI0eHR0dHBoRjRYLzV3UlFtQmh1UT09
Meeting ID: 340 506 1738
Passcode: 682539

October 4.   Jim Tracy, the author of “Sworn to Silence,” which details the crimes of Adirondack serial killer Robert Garrow, has won multiple national and state writing awards, including first place in the prestigious Associated Press Sports Editor contest. He spent ten years at The Post-Star, a Pulitzer Prize winning newspaper in Glens Falls, N.Y. He was born, raised, and still resides in the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains, with his wife, Angela, and teenaged daughters Sam and Shay. He’s spoken publicly about the Garrow case at several historical societies in New York state.
Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3405061738?pwd=dXI0eHR0dHBoRjRYLzV3UlFtQmh1UT09
Meeting ID: 340 506 1738
Passcode: 682539

October 18.  Virtual Speaker Joe Bruchac is an acclaimed children’s book author, poet, novelist, and storyteller, as well as a scholar of Native American culture.  He is the recipient of numerous awards including the American Book Award and the Virginia Hamilton Literature Award.  His most recent book “One Real American: The Life of Ely S. Parker,” is a nonfiction account of General Ely Parker, a member of the Seneca tribe and a close friend and confidant of Ulysses S. Grant.  It was Parker who wrote the official terms of surrender that were presented to Robert E. Lee at the Appomattox Court House in 1865.
Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3405061738?pwd=dXI0eHR0dHBoRjRYLzV3UlFtQmh1UT09
Meeting ID: 340 506 1738
Passcode: 682539

October 25.  Virtual Speaker.  Michael Kagan, who grew up in Delmar, NY and graduated from Bethlehem High school, is the Joyce Mack Professor of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and is the director of the UNLV Immigration Clinic, which defends children and families fighting deportation in Las Vegas. He has lived in Las Vegas, the setting for “The Battle to Stay in America”, since 2011. In 2019, Kagan was a plaintiff in one of the lawsuits that prevented the Trump administration from including a question about citizenship on the 2020 Census. He has written for The Washington Post, Salon.com, The Hill and The Daily Beast and is a leading national scholar of immigration and refugee law. The Battle to Stay in America is his first book.
Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3405061738?pwd=dXI0eHR0dHBoRjRYLzV3UlFtQmh1UT09
Meeting ID: 340 506 1738
Passcode: 682539

November coordinated by Bill Buell
December coordinated by Geri Mulligan

 Nov. 1: Marilyn Sassi talks about Proctors A local historian, educator and chair of the Proctors History Committee, Sassi will talk about the landmark Schenectady theater created during the heyday of vaudeville. A long-time resident of the Stockade in one of the oldest houses in the city, Sassi has been a museum curator at the Schenectady County Historical Society and been on the adjunct faculty at Schenectady County Community College and Hudson Valley Community College. A Schenectady native, Sassi is also an authority on folk art and antiques.

Nov. 8: Dave Pietrusza, the presidents, baseball and Amsterdam An Amsterdam native and U-Albany grad, Pietrusza retired as a state worker in 2007 but had become a nationally-recognized author long before that with books about baseball and the presidents. His 2007 work, “1920: The Year of the Six Presidents,” was named one of the best books of the year by Kirkus Reviews. His most recent book, “Too Long Ago,” came out in October of 2020 and tells the story of growing up in Amsterdam.

Nov. 15: Neil Yetwin talks about Mordecai Myers A Springfield, Massachusetts native, Yetwin is a retired history teacher at Linton/Schenectady High School, where in 1989 he was named winner of the Louis B. Yavner Award for teaching about The Holocaust and Civil Rights. In 2013, he produced a book on Schenectady Mayor Mordecia Myers, “To My Son: The Life and War Rememberances of Captain Mordecai Myers.” A graduate of Springfield College, he has written numerous articles on various topics for the Schenectady County Historical Society, and is also an authority on Moses Viney, a free black man in Schenectady in the 19th century.

Nov. 22: Jack Aernecke in conversation with Schenectady County historian Bill Buell Aernecke retired in 2007 after 42 years in the broadcasting business, the last 35 with WRGB, CBS-6. Born in Central Bridge in Schoharie County, Aernecke graduated from Notre Dame-Bishop Gibbons High School in Schenectady before continuing his studies at Siena College.He anchored Channel 6 coverage of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks from New York City; he’s visited Albany’s sister city of Tula, Russia, for a series of stories, and he’s co-hosted WRGB’s annual Labor Day Muscular Dystrophy Telethon with colleague Liz Bishop.

Nov. 29: Don Ackerman talks Schenectady politics A former high school history teacher and Schenectady County legislator, Ackerman will be discussing his new book, “The History of Schenectady Politics.” A native of Syracuse, Ackerman grew up in New Berlin and attended SUNY-Oneonta where he also earned his masters. He moved to the area to begin teaching history at Niskayuna High School in the late 1960s, and quickly became immersed in local politics, serving as Schenectady County Democratic chairman in the 1970s.

December 6, Virtual Speaker: Linda Wisniewski will discuss her recent book, Where the Stork Flies. This story is about Kat, who is at loose ends after her husband ditched her and their daughter followed suit. When a lost time traveler appears in her Pennsylvania kitchen, she grasps at the chance to give her life meaning by helping the woman find her way home. Slipping through a portal to an 1825 Polish village, Kat meets her own ancestors and discovers how her own mistakes have derailed her life.
Important – There will be no in person attendance on this day.

December 13: Local author James M. Odato, will present his book The Brain Had a Mouth: Lucy Gwin and the Voice of Disability Nation, a biography of author, journalist, disability rights activist, feminist, and founder of Mouth magazine, Lucy Gwin. This engrossing biography provides an intimate portrait of Gwin, detailing how she forged her own path into activism after an automobile accident that left her with a brain injury. More than just a publisher, Gwin fought against corruption in the rehabilitation industry, and much more.

 ****For the Q&A section of this program, we will be utilizing Zoom’s RAISE HAND feature. Before you join this program, please make sure that you have read through the web article linked below on how to use RAISE HAND for the device you will be using to participate in this ZOOM program. Please click here to learn the procedure. ****